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You are here: Home > Lawn Irrigation > Sprinkler Pumps > Pump Application
Booster
Suction Lift
A foot valve is a combined check valve and filter; it keeps debris out and your pump primed
Putting a screen around your foot valve provides increased filtration- good for dirty water.
Instead of a foot valve, you can use a basket strainer with a check valve.
Self-cleaning strainer (flushes itself with water to remove debris) and a check valve.

Connecting a Pump to Your Irrigation System

When purchasing a centrifugal pump for an irrigation system, you are most likely going to use it in one of two applications: suction lift, or booster. Both applications use essentially the same parts, but connecting a booster pump requires fewer parts and fewer steps.

Booster Pump Application

In some areas where the water is supplied by the city or municipality, the provided water pressure may not be enough to support the desired sprinkler system. This is where a booster pump would be used. A booster pump set-up requires essentially the same parts as a suction lift application, with a few differences. The typical set-up is:
  • The municipal water line is the supply line provided by your local water company. In most residential areas, the connection from the city water to your house is located at the water meter in the front yard, next to the sidewalk.
  • A backflow preventer is an essential safety precaution that prevents contaminants from entering the water system.
  • A pump should be chosen based on how powerful you need to be, and the GPM and PSI you need it to provide.
  • A pump enclosure protects your pump from weather, debris, and tampering.
  • A cement platform is necessary to keep the pump securely in place.
  • A pump start relay converts the 24V signal from your sprinkler timer to the 110V or 220V signal needed to start and stop the pump. Without a pump start relay, your timer cannot communicate with your pump.
  • A ball valve on the discharge side of your pump allows you to shut off water to the rest of your system for repairs and maintenance.
  • A Y-strainer provides additional filtering; debris that is small enough to pass through your intake filter won't damage your pump, but it can damage your sprays or rotors.
  • A pressure gauge on either side of your Y-strainer are optional, but a very good idea. They will let you know when it's time to clean (flush) the Y-strainer. If the pressure going into the Y-strainer is higher than the pressure coming out by 7 PSI or more, it's a good time to flush the strainer.
  • The valve manifold is what connects your pump pipeline to your sprinkler system. From this point on, your sprinkler system will be the same as any typical installation.
There are of course additional tools and supplies needed for the job, including pipe, fittings, PVC glue, etc, but these are very specific to the job you are doing. Pipe size should be based on the intake and discharge size of the pump.

Suction Lift Application

When installing a pump for a suction lift application, there are some basic supplies that you will need, regardless of your water source, how close it is to the house, or how much pressure you need. These basic parts are:
  • Some type of filter and check valve (there are several options for this; you'll have to decide based on your budget and what type of filter you want).
  • A ball valve on the intake side of your pump allows you to shut off water to the pump for repairs and maintenance.
  • A pump should be chosen based on how powerful you need to be, and the GPM and PSI you need it to provide.
  • A pump enclosure protects your pump from weather, debris, and tampering.
  • A cement platform is necessary to keep the pump securely in place.
  • A pump start relay converts the 24V signal from your sprinkler timer to the 110V or 220V signal needed to start and stop the pump. Without a pump start relay, your timer cannot communicate with your pump.
  • A ball valve on the discharge side of your pump allows you to shut off water to the rest of your system for repairs and maintenance.
  • A Y-strainer provides additional filtering; debris that is small enough to pass through your intake filter won't damage your pump, but it can damage your sprays or rotors.
  • A pressure gauge on either side of your Y-strainer are optional, but a very good idea. They will let you know when it's time to clean (flush) the Y-strainer. If the pressure going into the Y-strainer is higher than the pressure coming out by 7 PSI or more, it's a good time to flush the strainer.
  • The valve manifold is what connects your pump pipeline to your sprinkler system. From this point on, your sprinkler system will be the same as any typical installation.
There are of course additional tools and supplies needed for the job, including pipe, fittings, PVC glue, etc, but these are very specific to the job you are doing. Pipe size should be based on the intake and discharge size of the pump.
 
   
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