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Shop Irrigation Pipe And Sprinkler Tubing At Sprinkler Warehouse

Sprinkler Warehouse is the place to shop for all of your sprinkler pipe and irrigation needs.

Learn how to fix a broken sprinkler pipe with our sprinkler tutorial videos. Sprinkler School, hosted by Sprinkler Warehouse is the place to find sprinkler irrigation tutorials including videos and articles. Our parts and repair articles can help teach you how to repair a broken sprinkler pipe. Our customers can purchase these repair fittings, replacement pipes, and more. These repair parts can be found online or in-store at Sprinkler Warehouse.

Shop Underground Sprinkler Tubing Online Or In-Store

Underground sprinkler pipe varies depending on the needs of your irrigation system. Many customers enjoy the benefits of the blu-lock piping because it eliminates the need for glue, primer, and clamps. Others prefer to use the traditional SCH 40 and Class 200 PVC pipe to connect their sprinklers from the valves to the sprays or rotors. All of these options can be found online and in-store at Sprinkler Warehouse.

What kind of irrigation pipe to use? Watch these videos for more information about sprinkler pipe and irrigation tubing:

Decoding SCH, Class & SDR Pipe Markings

Attaching Blu-Lock To PVC

Connecting Poly to Blu-Lock

Browse Our Tutorial Series For All Things Related To Sprinkler Pipe Repair

Whether you're looking to repair PVC pipe or install irrigation pipe for the first time, we have the tutorials for you. From videos to articles, sprinkler warehouse is committed to assisting our customers with their DIY pipe installation needs. Learn the difference between SCH 40, Class 200 pipe, and blu-lock pipe as well as how to install the various types of pipe.

Get The Sprinkler System Pipe Sizes You Need At Sprinkler Warehouse

Our customers can browse and purchase a variety of irrigation pipe sizes as well as learn about PVC pipe sizes and how to apply those products to their irrigation system. Sprinkler Warehouse stocks PVC pipe including the Class 315, Class 200, SCH 40, and blu-lock lateral pipe coils. Not sure which size to get? We have several articles and videos to help assist our customers in choosing an appropriate irrigation pipe for their irrigation system.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What type of tubing is used for sprinklers?

Sprinkler pipe includes PVC and Blu-lock Pipe. Schedule XX designates the wall thickness at a certain size. For example, a 1 pipe in schedule 40 has a wall thickness of .133; schedule 80 has a wall thickness of .179. Class 200 pipe, the most common class pipe used in irrigation, is rated for 200 pounds per square inch pressure (psi) and has a wall thickness of .063 for a 1 pipe. It is thinner than schedule 40. Unlike PVC, blu-lock pipe locks together instead of needing to be glued and primed.

What is the best pipe to use for a sprinkler system?

A general method is to use a variety of sprinkler pipes throughout the system. If you choose the traditional PVC pipe, Sprinkler Warehouse recommends using schedule 40 for the mainline of the system and then run that pipe from the water meter, through the backflow, and to the valves. Then use class 200 for the laterals, or after the valves.

What size tubing is used for sprinkler systems?

It is important to use the appropriate size pipe for your flow rate. Using the correct size will help keep friction low which will help to reduce pressure loss. Do not use a smaller pipe diameter than is recommended. It is better to use a larger pipe diameter rather than a smaller diameter if necessary. In certain instances sizing up can help to compensate for low pressure and or for very long pipe runs.